Hasselblad SWC/M Super Wide Camera

Hasselblad SWC/M Super Wide Camera

Matthew Osborne Photography / Mr Leica

November 2017

The Hasselblad SWC (Super Wide Camera) family of cameras had a production life span from 1954-2009.  From researching online my particular camera model, a Hasselblad SWC/M with CF lens attached and a spirit level built into both the camera body and the newer style view finder seems to be dated from around 1982-1988.

Hasselblad SWC/M Super Wide Camera

Hasselblad SWC – Intro

A Hasselblad SWC/M comes with a Zeiss Biogon 38mm f4.5 CF lens attached.  Unlike the more common Hasselblad 500 series / V-series camera models the lens on the SWC cameras does not detach.  The SWC is a camera designed and built around the very well-regarded Zeiss Biogon 38mm lens.  It is not like a normal 500 series Hasselblad camera (as I think of them) as it has no mirror/ ground glass / waist level view finder setup you normally find at the heart of every Hasselblad.  Instead it just has an external viewfinder to aid basic composition.  To focus the SWC camera I need to use hyperfocal distance (like I would on a Leica rangefinder camera for street photography) and dial in a preferred focus distance on the Biogon lens (such as 2 meters) and then roughly gauge by eye this distance from the camera to the subject.  As the camera is a wide-angle camera there is greater depth of field (DOF) than on say a long lens (especially once the SWC lens is stopped down).  The 38mm Biogon lens is roughly equivalent to 21mm on a 35mm camera sensor so gives a pretty wide field of view compared to the standard 80mm Zeiss kit lens on a Hasselblad 500CM Classic which is equivalent to 50mm in 35mm camera terms.

Hasselblad SWC – First Thoughts

My first thoughts when collecting the Hasselblad SWC/M were small, compact and lightweight compared to the Hasselblad 500CM + telephoto lens(es) I had been using prior to picking up the camera.  The SWC has a very solid and audible clunk when you release the shutter.  Much more so than my 500CM and 501C and much for fluid movement but then it is a newer camera so perhaps to be expected.  The SWC finder view is big and bright but also very distorted so it is difficult to retain a mind-set that the photos will not also look distorted.  The spirit level built into the SWC finder is a very nice touch as you can see if an image horizon is level without taking your eye from the finder.  Well done Hasselblad.  The CF Zeiss Biogon 38mm lens looks very similar to all my other Zeiss CF lenses and is solid and seemingly well-built.

Hasselblad Wedding Photography

When I do Leica wedding photography with my digital Leica M240 camera one of my most used lenses is the Zeiss ZM Biogon 21mm f2.8 lens.  I have a 28mm Leica Elmarit-M f2.8 lens but found the 28mm focal length not quite wide enough in situation with lots of people and/ or confined spaces.  The 21mm ZM Biogon is great for bridal prep shots with multiple bridesmaids in a small room or during a wedding ceremony to capture the bride and groom and some of the guests in the background.  For previous analogue film weddings I found the standard lenses on many of my medium format film cameras too narrow to capture everything.  For a Hasselblad wedding I have the Zeiss Distagon 50mm f4 which is the same as 28mm but nothing wider.  Sometime it is just nice to have a super wide lens to photograph a whole room such as the inside of a church.  A wider lens also has a great depth in focus so for moving people photos taken in a candid street photography / documentary wedding photography style it is easier to nail focus with a wider lens than with a telephoto lens (when using manual focus).  This was one reason/ ‘excuse’ to buy a Hasselblad SWC/M.

Hasselblad SWC for Street Photography

Leica cameras are popular street photography cameras when focused using hyperfocal distance.  As mentioned briefly above it means I set a desired distance and aperture on the lens and this gives me a certain range in focus (say everything between 1-3 meters).  Once set it basically makes a Leica camera a full frame 35mm point at shoot camera (if you keep your subjects within the area in focus from the camera (Ie. if something is 4m away I need to walk closer before taking the photo or move the distance on the lens to further away before taking my shot).  The same methodology can be applied to the Hasselblad SWC camera, setting an aperture and focus distance on the 38mm Biogon lens.  As the 38mm is equivalent to 21mm in 35mm terms it gives quite a deep depth in focus. (Telephoto lenses have a much shorter distance in focus at any aperture).  The SWC camera can them become a 6×6 medium format point and shoot camera for street photography, weddings or otherwise.  The biggest restriction in the UK is sufficient light so the SWC is more suited to bright conditions or high ISO film stock than low light photography for this technique.

Hasselblad SWC for Travel Photography

One big selling point of the Hasselblad SWC for me is the compact size and relatively low weight.  The Hassy SWC/M weighs under 1.4kg (with camera, finder and film back attached) and in comparison a Hasselblad 500CM camera + 80mm kit lens + film back weights closer to 1.6kg (but for the lenses I use the Zeiss Sonnar 180mm f4 CF lens alone weighs 1.1kg!)  For my overseas model photography photoshoots I tend to take with me the smallest cameras that provide sufficiently high image quality (and are fun to use and reliable).  It could be argued that my Mamiya 6 and Fuji GF670 are more suited as medium format travel cameras but I much prefer the rendering of Hasselblad lenses to the Mamiya glass and I find the GF670 fragile (currently awaits repair) and not exciting to use (even if it is a very capable camera).

Hasselblad SWC/M!

Hasselblad Fashion Photography

Another reason to buy the Hasselblad SWC is for my Hasselblad fashion photography.  I love the Hasselblad telephoto lenses such as the Zeiss Sonnar 180mm f4 lens and Zeiss Macro-Planar 120mm f4 lens for portraits but to photograph clothes full length a wider lens is often easier.  The Hassy SWC 38mm Biogon lens could be deemed too wide but many fashion photographers have used wide lenses in the past to give their fashion photos a different look.  I think I may use the SWC camera more for wedding photography but I hope I can also use it for some of my model photography to add some variety to my work.  For environment portraits a wider lens is also very beneficial as it helps to capture both the model and their environment.  I have shot many times in Budapest for example and taken headshot / half body portraits yet the surrounding location detail outside the field of view might have added additional interest to the images if included.  I think of all the locations I have done model photography the city that screams “use a wide lens” the most is without doubt New York city.  I need to go back soon!  On a previous visit to NYC I used my 35mm Hasselblad XPan camera for a wider view but found I usually prefer 6×6 format to panoramic for my model/ fashion portraits.  Using both the wide-angle Hasselblad SWC/M and a standard Hasselblad 501C /500CM body side by side gives me the best of both, with the option for wider environment portrait / wide angle fashion look photos and also shallow depth isolated headshots and portraits with a longer telephoto lens.  When using two Hasselblad bodies I also have the advantage of the Hasselblad V system being modular.  (See more below).

Hasselblad SWC Fashion

Hasselblad Modular Cameras (Specifically Film Backs)

One huge advantage of investing into the Hasselblad 500 series (V-series) cameras (including the SWC camera) is the cameras are modular in their design.  This means I can unclip a standard Hasselblad A12 film back (or any other film back) from any Hasselblad 500 camera and use it on my new Hassy SWC/M.  Having multiple film backs to use can be really valuable during a Hasselblad wedding for example.  If I was using a Mamiya 6 camera for group photos and finished my roll of film mid-session I would need to halt proceedings, rewind the film and reload with fresh film to continue.  When using a Hasselblad I carry multiple pre-loaded film backs and as soon as film finishes in one back I can quickly unclip and attach a second back with film loaded ready to go.  Another advantage of multiple film backs is I can load one back with colour film and one back with black and white film.  For Hasselblad fashion photography (or film weddings) or any client shoot I can shoot a mix of colour and black and white film and swap the backs between cameras.  For example shoot a wide scene in B&W on the Hasselblad SWC then take the back from the Hasselblad 500CM (loaded with colour film) to capture a colourful confetti group photo straight after.  The 500CM can then capture some B&W wedding portraits on a long lens and so on.  I would travel with at least two film backs for model photography trips and if possible carry 2 Hasselblad bodies too, the SWC/M and a 500CM or 501C.

Hasselblad Focusing Screen Adapter 41025 SWC/M

An obvious disadvantage of the Hasselblad SWC/M is the fact that the viewfinder does not allow for critical focusing.  Maybe it is because I have used Leica rangefinder cameras intensively for a prolonged period but for much of my photography I like to line up straight lines (horizontal and vertical) in a scene with my frame lines in the viewfinder. For example at a church wedding I would centre the viewfinder to the church aisle to capture equal detail on both sides and ensure it is aligned to the straight edges of the walls.  With the Hasselblad SWC the finder view it is only a rough guide of composition.  I would hate to have to crop every SWC photo after scanning to straighten and centre each picture.  Luckily there is another option

There is a Hasselblad Focusing Screen Adapter 41025 for SWC (SWC/M) cameras which basically makes the SWC into a mini 4×5 camera/ large format camera.  On my large format cameras like the SpeedGraphic and Sinar F2 I compose an image upside down on the ground glass on the back of the camera and then critically focus using a magnifying loop.  The Hasselblad focusing screen adapter is basically a ground glass as you would use on the top of a Hasselblad 500CM but on the back of the camera.  The SWC has no mirror so a photo is composed by just looking through the lens at the image displayed on the glass.  On a large format camera in bright conditions I put a jacket over my head and the back of the camera to block light glare.  Luckily the clever engineers at Hasselblad have a much neater design.  The focus screen adapter accepts any Hasselblad 500 viewfinder such as the pop up waist level viewfinder (WLF), a 45 degree prism finder or a chimney finder as examples.  To critically compose the Hasselblad SWC I just unclip the A12 film back, clip on the focus screen adapter (with WTF or prism already attached), compose (with camera on a tripod for example), unclip the adapter, reattached the film back and take the photo.  This process is not for every photo as takes more time than quickly estimating a composing and focus with the standard SWC finder on the top of the camera but it is a nice option to have for when I have more time (and it will be more rewarding to get the planned composition rather than cropping something in/ out of frame that was not desired.

Hasselblad and Leica Cameras

I like and use Leica cameras as they are well-built, enjoyable to operate and have great lenses that capture sharp pleasing images.  To get ‘better’ than what Leica film cameras could give me I had to look at larger film formats.  I have tried and use various highly regarded medium format film cameras but it is Hasselblad cameras which I seem to enjoy and appreciate the most.  Hasselblad 500 system cameras are of a similar build quality to Leicas and with equality good optics made by Carl Zeiss.  I have enjoyed using Hasselblad 501C and Hasselblad 500CM cameras and this gave me the confidence to buy the Hasselblad SWC/M.  The SWC/M is more Leica like being more compact and operated more like a Leica rangefinder (in terms of composing via the external finder) and I would argue for my particular SWC/M model the film advance lever and shutter release sound and feel even better than it’s 501C/500CM siblings.  Like a Leica M3 and the Hasselblad 501C / 500CM, the Hasselblad SWC/M is 100% manual and has no batteries or electronics.  I love the simplicity of manual cameras without batteries and the knowledge that they cannot develop electrical faults in the future that may not be able to be repaired.  I enjoy using my Mamiya RZ67 Pro II camera but I often have battery related issues that I don’t get with a 500CM.  I have some nice Fuji 645 format film cameras but the GA645 specifically relies heavily on electronics and one of mine seems to have sadly developed a terminal electronic fault.  At least manual Hasselblad and Leica cameras are in theory more likely to keep going into the future even if they need a CLA (clean, lube, adjustment) every so often.
L1008609LR

Hasselblad SWC – Specifications

As with many of the cameras I own and have talked about on this blog, Ken Rockwell has also reviewed the camera and kindly details all the specifics of the Hasselblad SWC on his site.  Rather than me repeat the same camera facts please see a link below to Ken Rockwell’s SWC review

Hasselblad Resale Value

One good thing about investing in older Hasselblad film cameras is they seem to hold their value quite well (and even appear to increasing in value/cost over the last 12 months or so).  If I find the Hasselblad SWC/M camera isn’t really for me at least I can say I tried it.  I would never have discovered my love for Leica and Hasselblad cameras if I didn’t take the chance and move away from the camera(s) I used at the time.  I never know, the SWC/M might become my new most used most loved film camera!  Either way I will enjoy finding out!

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Author: matthewosbornephotography

Coventry, UK studio based Model and Wedding Photographer offering both Medium Format Film and Digital Images. 1-2-1 Photography and Lighting Tuition also available.

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