Fuji Acros 100 Discontinued

Fuji Acros 100 Discontinued

It’s old news but Fujifilm announced earlier this year that it’s B&W Fuji Acros 100 film will be discontinued in October 2018, both the 35mm and 120 versions. Sad times but there is still time to stock up while you can if you can find a Fujifilm distributor with stock left.  (Some online camera film suppliers still showed stock available at the time of me writing this post (August 2018)). (I have some packs of B&W Fuji Acros 100 in  my fridge, both 35mm and 120 formats so I will enjoy that until it’s finished).

Fuji Acros 100

Fuji Acros 100, also known as Neopan 100 Acros is a super fine grain ISO 100 film.  In some respects I would say Acros is perhaps similar to Kodak T-Max 100 film but  i’m sure Acros fans would probably argue otherwise!

I’ve shot a lot more Kodak T-Max 100 film over the years than Fuji Acros 100 but I think I use Fomapan 100 film the most of all.  I enjoy experimenting with different black and white film stocks but here some of my Fuji Acros 100 film scans to show the results it can give.  If you like the look of Acros there is probably still time to buy some.

Fuji Acros 100 Flickr Photos

(Click any image to see the camera used)

35mm Fujifilm Acros 100

Can you spot the Leica photos from the Nikon photos?

Leica M2 + Fuji Acros 100

35mm Fuji Acros 100

Sopot Beach Photoshoot

Fuji Acros 100 High Key

Fuji Acros

Leica M3 + Fuji Acros

135 Fuji Acros 100 + Leica M2

120 Fuji Acros 100

(Can you guess the camera used!? 4 different MF cameras..)

Hasselblad Fashion

Mamiya 6 Fashion

Hasselblad Fashion

Hasselblad Film Fashion

Hasselblad Model Photography

Mamiya 6 Portrait

Fuji GF670 Portrait

120 Fuji Acros 100 Portrait

Fujifilm Neopan Acros 100

Mamiya 645 Super B&W Portrait

Mamiya Sekor 80mm f2.8 N

Thoughts? Image Quality – Camera vs Film

I will be impressed if you guessed the camera used correctly for the photos above!?  Assuming you got at least a couple of guesses wrong, the point I wanted to make is the choice of film used in your analogue camera is perhaps almost as important as your camera and lens choice.  Assuming the camera and lens used is “quite good”loading a professional grade film stock such a Fuji Acros 100 is the next biggest step forward to capturing and creating a “high quality” image.  I believe good film such as Neopan Acros 100 or something like Ilford Delta 100 (a personal favourite) will make a much bigger difference to the final image than using only a premium camera brand but any old  cheap film on the market.

This statement depends on the look you are wanting to create of course.  You may shoot film rather than digital to create an “artistic impression” of a scene or subject.  To me Polaroid film would be good for this.  For my taste however I look to create an image as perfect as I can on film in terms of sharpness and resolution yet still enjoy all the quirks of using film cameras.  With this in mind I feel using a film such a Fuji Acros 100 will bring me nearer to my goal than buying a new film camera.  To me an OK film camera with “great” film can produce a “great” image but a “great” film camera with OK film can only create an OK image.  Nikon film cameras and lenses are quite a lot cheaper than Leica cameras and Leica lenses but I like all the images captured equally in that respect.

Conclusion

Knowing what I know now I feel I should “invest” more in good film and less in new gear when looking to create a “nice” photo.  That said I like the experimental aspect of using lots of different cameras, lenses and films so i’m sure I will never learn.

Lastly, looking at these Fuji Acros photos again side by side with fresh eyes I should probably have used the film more that I did.  Maybe it is time for me to stock up!Fuji Acros 100

Matt

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Kentmere 100 Film

Kentmere 100 Film

Matthew Osborne Photography – August 2018

In my last blog post I discussed Kodak black and white film, specifically Kodak Double-X.  Another B&W film that to my eyes gives a classic look is Kentmere 100 film.  Kentmere film is only able in 35mm format and comes in two speeds, 100 and 400.  I have only shot with Kentmere 100 but I liked the results enough that I didn’t look to try Kentmere 400.

kentmere 100 film

I bought my first rolls of Kentmere 100 film in the US at either Adorama or B&H I think during a photography workshop I was running in New York.  What I didn’t realise at the time is Kentmere film is actually made by Ilford film.  It was first available in the US as a budget alternative to Ilford films but is now available in the UK also.  With all the great black and white films available on the market I have not bought another batch of Kentmere film yet as I am still experiementing with new films.  The latest film I tried was Ilford Pan 100 so I will share some samples and thoughts once I have shot a few more rolls of it.

Kentmere 100 – Flickr Photos

(Click any image to see the camera used)

Kentmere 100 Film

Kentmere 100 Film Portrait

35mm Kentmere 100 Film

Nikon F4 + Kentmere 100 film

Olympus 35RC Camera

Leica Elmar 50mm f2.8

Leica M3 + Kentmere 100 Film

Bessa R3A + Kentmere 100

Band Shoot

Brooklyn Bridge New York Panoramic

Hasselblad XPan NYC Cityscape

Kentmere 100 Film Summary

Originally I bought this film because of the low price plus I like to experiment with different film stocks.  I was pleasantly surprised by the sharpness and fine grain of Kentmere 100 when compared to other classic film emulsions such as Ilford FP4 plus and Ilford HP5 plus.  I find 35mm FP4 a little to grainy for my portraits and similar to 35mm Kodak Tri-X 400 in that regard.  That said I happily shoot 120 format HP5, FP4 and Tri-X  in my medium format film cameras such as the Hasselblad and Mamiya 6 / 7 / RZ67 as the grain in the larger negatives is less pronounced.

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Film Photography

Ilford Photo

Kodak Double-X

35mm Kodak Double-X Film (“Kodak Eastman Double-X 5222”)

Matthew Osborne Photography – August 2018
Kodak Double-XKodak Double-X

I think it was a couple of years ago when I purchased a 400ft bulk roll of 35mm Kodak Double-X 5222 film. Fresh stock in a Kodak factory sealed tin as shown above.  Kodak Double X or “Kodak XX” is black and white negative film produced primarily for the movie industry “Kodak Motion Picture” film.  (*The colour Kodak Motion Picture film is called Kodak Vision3 film stock which I also use and will cover in a later blog post).

Movies such as James Bond -“Casino Royale” had scenes shot on the classic Kodak Double X B&W film which I believe is unchanged from the 1960s.  Unlike the modern T-grain Kodak T-Max black and white film stocks that have a much finer grain structure and more modern look, Kodak Double-X has a classic grain and more vintage appearance.

Kodak recommend rating Double-X at ISO 200 in daylight but I have shot it at anything from ISO 100-1600 (I think) and still received great results.  I feel it is much better in low light than Kodak Tri-X 400 film or Kodak T-Max 400 film and believe it should have a native ISO closer to ISO 640.

Kodak Eastman Double-X 400ft

I bulk load the 400ft film onto 35mm cassettes to use in my Leica film cameras (and other 35mm film camera).

Below are some sample images of me shooting Kodak Double-X in my various film cameras.  All film was home developed and scanned with a flatbed Epson V800 scanner. (*Some film negatives have scratches on from a cheap bulk loader I used).

Kodak Double-X Flickr Photos

(Click any image to see the camera used and what I rated the film at)

Hasselblad XPan + BWXX

Hasselblad XPan Panoramic Landscape

XPan City Lights

Hasselblad Xpan

Hasselblad XPan Portrait

Kodak Double-X 5222 Film

Leica M6 + Kodak Eastman Double-X 5222

Leica Elmarit-M 28mm Fashion

Kodak Eastman Double-X 5222

Leica Portrait - Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0

Kodak Double-X Portrait

Hasselblad XPan Portrait

BMA Models

Triple Exposure

Nikon F4 + Kodak Double-X

Leica M4-P Film Camera

Classic Portrait

Double-X 5222 Film

Have you focused yet..? :)

Inside Grand Central Terminal, NYC

Kodak Eastman Double-X 5222

Kodak Double X 5222

London Photography Workshop

Black and White

Leica M6 Wedding

Leica M3 + Leica Summicron 75mm APO

Leica Wedding - Leica M3!

As you can see I use Kodak Double-X quite often.  You can find more examples images in my various model photography overseas photoshoots – Poland, Hungary and Paris (especially).  I have used Double-X during multiple Leica photography workshops in London and also for one of the Leica workshops I ran in New York (using the Hasselblad XPan).  For my Leica wedding photography and bridal shoots I find Kodak Double X great for low light photography or varied lighting conditions.  I guess in summary I like the film a lot!

Some different Kodak B&W film stock photos as a very rough comparison
35mm Kodak T-Max 100

Leica M2 Portrait

Kodak TMax 100 B&W

35mm Kodak T-Max 400

Leica M3 Portrait

Leica M3 Film Portrait

Kodak Tri-X 400

Leica M2 Portrait - Tri-X 400@200

Kodak Tri-X Love!

35mm Kodak Plus-X 125

Kodak Plus-X Fashion

Leica Summicron 50mm DR

I have opinions on all the film stocks listed above but in summary I find 35mm Kodak Tri-X too grainy for my taste so I have used it the least.  The sharpness and fine grain of 35mm Kodak T-Max 400 always impresses me and I use it a lot.  Discontinued Kodak Plus-X is a fantastic film but sadly I got into film photography too late and Kodak had already ended production in 2011 (I understand).  Kodak Double-X gives the best classic look of the listed Kodak films, to my eyes.

35mm Cinestill BwXX film

If you would like to avoid the hassle of bulk loading your own 35mm film or you don’t think you shoot enough film to use up a 400ft roll then there is another option.  The Brother’s Wright, aka founders of Cinestill film, sell a rebranded version of Kodak Double-X simply called BwXX which can be bought in individual 35mm cassettes.

I will review more film stocks when I get chance and add them to the Film Photography tab at the top of this site where a list of film stock links already exists.  Coming soon!

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120 Fomapan 100 Film

120 Fomapan 100 Film – Hasselblad Portraits

Matthew Osborne Photography / Mr Leica

November 2015

Firstly sorry for the lack of new blog posts recently. There are a lot in the pipeline when I find time!

Fresh film. Perhaps the cheapest 120 B&W film in UK. Great for camera testing or for that softer classic look. #fomapan #fomapan100 #120film #blackandwhite #mediumformat #ilovefilm #ishootfilm #filmrocks www.MrLeica.com

120 Fomapan 100 Film

Fomapan 100 Classic is a traditional panchromatically sensitized black and white negative film made in the Czech Republic.  To my eyes it is as sharp as B&W films from Kodak such as T-Max but had a more classic grain structure more similar to Ilford FP4+ or perhaps Kodak Tri-X.  Again from my experience, Fomapan 100 prroduces low contrast negatives in normal lighting conditions.  Some of my Fomapan 100 photos are higher contrast due to developing or lighting used.

Fomapan 100 film is my current favourite / best value for money black and white film in 120 format. I enjoy using various B&W films from the likes of Kodak, Ilford and Fuji but Fomapan manage to price their film below the competition and the results are actually quite nice. I pay around £3 a roll for 120 Fomapan 100 film and the next cheapest would be I think £4 a roll for the likes of Kodak Tri-X 400, Kodak T-Max 100 & 400 and Fuji Acros 100 and then £5 for Ilford Delta 100 and 400. I try to find the lowest prices!

What I like a lot about Fomapan 100 is I can shoot it at ISO 50-400 and develop it at box speed. This may be true for other films but I have not noticed it. For medium format film photography shooting in available light ISO 400 is normally the go to film speed for me in the UK. In the studio I shoot ISO 100 films more. Fomapan gives me both. For ISO 800 exposures I would rather shoot Kodak Tri-X 400 or T-Max 400 films and push them
one stop in developing.

I constantly swing between the different film stocks trying to find a favourite but as yet there is no clear winner. Kodak Tri-X has some of the nicest tones and Kodak T-Max also. Ilford Delta 100 and Pan F 50 are amongst the sharpest films I have used and can look almost digital in 120 format. I would say I prefer Fuji Acros to T-Max 100 especially for portraits but both can create nice images. At this stage I prefer Kodak Tri-X to HP5 for the tones and overall look of the pictures.

Since getting my Hasselblad 501C I have been shooting much more medium format film and 35mm film is currently on hold!  Here are some examples of me shooting 120 Fomapan 100 film.

Hasselblad Film Portraits

Firstly a sneak peek from Poland! Full post to follow.. 🙂

Fomapan 100 Fashion

Next, more 120 Fomapan 100 film portraits shot in the UK

Hasselblad Sonnar 150mm

Zeiss Sonnar + Hasselblad

Fomapan 100 Classic

Hasselblad Zeiss Distagon Portrait

21mm Hasselblad extension tube

Hasselblad Zeiss 50mm Portrait

Fomapan 100@400

I am also using Fomapan 100 4×5 sheet film in my large format cameras so those results are to follow too!

Mamiya 645 Super

Mamiya 645 Super – First Thoughts

Medium Format Film Camera – Matthew Osborne Photography

Happy Christmas to me #Mamiya 645 Super #mediumformatfilm #filmphotography #filmisnotdead @mrleicacom

I recently bought myself a Mamiya 645 Super medium format film camera.  When I wrote the last post “Contax 645 vs Mamiya 645” (link below) the camera had not yet arrived.  Now I have had chance to run a roll of film through it what do I think?

My first observation is the 645 format is in horizontal orientation in the camera rather than vertical.  As a portrait photographer I tend to shoot in the portrait orientation.  For anyone used to a digital camera such as a DSLR you might think so what?  Well I bought this particular camera as I wanted a waist level viewfinder (“WLF”).  To focus you look down at the top of the camera and it will show a horizontal image on the glass.  To take a portrait photo I have to hold the camera on it’s side and it is not quite as easy to compose when working quickly.  You don’t have this problem with say my Rolleiflex SL66E or a Hasselblad as they are 6×6 format.  I don’t have the issue with the Mamiya RZ67 either as it has a rotating film back.  That said the WLF makes the camera smaller and lighter than with a prism view finder so I am happy to compromise.

The modular design of the Mamiya 645 Super means I can remove and replace the film back.  For wedding photography it is good practice to have multiple film backs, for both speed and efficiency but also so you can load perhaps one film back with colour film and one with black and white.  For that reason I bought myself a spare 120 film back.

The Mamiya 645 Super comes with a Mamiya Sekor 80mm f2.8 lens as standard.  It is small and lightweight but the reason I bought the camera was to make use of the fast Mamiya Sekor C 80mm f1.9 lens.  I have this lens as it came on my Mamiya 645 1000S (link below) so the first task was to transfer it onto the M645 Super camera.

I bought the camera to use for analogue wedding photography as I can get 15 photos per roll and the 80mm f1.9 lens lets me photograph in low light conditions.  I now plan to use it alongside my Leica M3s and other cameras for film photography weddings.

#filmdeveloping #filmphotography #model Roisin #photographer www.MrLeica.com #camera #mamiya 645 Super #kodakfilm

My first chance to use the Mamiya 645 Super was in my Coventry studio for model photography with friend and model Roisin.  Above is an iPhone photo of my first 645 Mamiya negatives drip drying above the bath.  Below are a few samples of the resulting photos once the negatives had been scanned.

Mamiya 645 Super + T-Max

Mamiya 645 Super + 80mm f1.9

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Mamiya 645 Super @ f1.9

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Film OR Digital, Not Both!

Film OR Digital, Not Both!

Matthew Osborne Photography

I am a big fan of film photography, 35mm Leicas and various medium format film cameras.  I much prefer the results of film over digital, whether colour film or black and white.  What annoys me the most is I shoot very little film as a percentage of the total number of photos I shoot.  I often try to have a film camera with me when using my digital Leica M9.   The problem I find is two or three hours may pass, the model shoot has finished and I get so caught up in the moment with digital I forget to shoot any film.

On a recent trip abroad I was doing some street photography.

Day One

On the first day I took three cameras, the usual! Two film cameras (Leica M2 and Fuji GF670 Pro) and the digital Leica M9.  I also had four Leica M lenses with me to chose from.  As a result I wasted far to much time trying to decide what equipment to use and camera back with mostly digital photos.

Day Two

I only packed two film cameras plus the Sekonic light meter, leaving the Leica M9 at home.

(1) The 35mm Leica M2 film camera with 50mm Leica Summicron f2 lens attached (+ 1.4x viewfinder magnifier from my Leica M9)(to give me a similar view to the Leica M3) loaded with black and white Kodak T-Max 100 film.

(2) The medium format film Fuji GF670 folding camera loaded with colour 120 Kodak Portra film with the 6×6 format selected.  (the camera gives the option of 6×6 or 6×7 but I prefer square format).

I metered the light on arrival in the shadows and then put the light meter away for the rest of the day.  I knew I would be shooting mostly in the shadow of the buildings plus film tends to retain highlight detail more than digital.  I started with the Leica M2 shooting B&W, looking for rectangular composition and where the light played a big part of the image.  I then switched to my Fuji GF670 and instead started to look for strong colours in the frame and a square composition.  The Fuji GF 670 is much more modern vs. the M2 so has a light meter to help you get the correct exposure.  That said, film is so forgiving I do not worry too much if I am +1 /+2 or -1 / -2 over or under exposed by guessing the exposure using the Leica M2.

Results

By only having one lens on each camera and only film cameras I was 100% focused on each photo I was taking.  I didn’t have two cameras around my neck.  One in use in my hand and the other packed safely away in my Billingham bag so not to be a distraction.  I had an enjoyable walk with the cameras and came away much more satisfied that when I shot potentially similar images with the digital Leica M9 the day before.

Conclusion

I think the key to ‘success’ is if I want to shoot film then I must put the digital camera away and use one film camera at a time, not try to juggle one in each hand and have the Leica M9 around my neck.

Film Photography

After having recently bought the medium format film Fuji GF670 and now also the 35mm film Leica M3 I am more determined than ever to start shooting more film.  I find it just as easy as shooting digital and film is more forgiving in terms of latitude (if I can only list one advantage of film over digital!)

Five rolls of C41 film are due back from the lab imminently so I will get some new examples posted soon once scanned, including the first images from the Fuji GF670 that I am very excited to see!

Matt

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35mm Black & White Film Photography

35mm Black & White Film Photography
Leica Photographer

35mm Black & White Film Photography

Good news! I am back shooting 35mm film photography after my recent purchase of a 1958 Leica M2 film camera. I already had a Voigtlander Bessa R3A but the shutter has jammed so I decided to treat myself to a Leica film camera. I love my Leica digital cameras (M8 and Leica M9) but the older Leica M2 has exceeded all expectations.

As the Voigtlander Bessa had jammed mid roll of film I decided to rewind the film in camera then load it into my Leica M2. I then fired off 15 shots with the lens cap on to advance the film (the Leica M2 film advance lever motion is to die for!). I then fired off some shots around the house to finish the film and to check the M2 was operating aswell as it felt in my hand.

As I still had a roll of undeveloped film from last year in the fridge, I decided to develop both rolls of film at the same time. Both film spools were 35mm Kodak T-Max 100 exposed at ISO200. I developed my black and white film in a Paterson tank using semi-stand development and Rodinal + water. My thermometer was not working so I just used a temperature that was warm to the touch. Luckily film is very forgiving! I stood the film for 35mins and then checked the results after fixing. All good. Both rolls of film were exposed correctly. Phew!

Here are a few samples of the negatives I have scanned so far

Voigtlander Bessa R3A + CV Nokton 40mm f1.4
– Monika
Kodak T-Max 100

Leica M2 Test Shots (Please excuse the subjects!)
M2 + CV Nokton 35mm f1.2 ASPH ii
Leica M2 Film!
Leica M2 Test Shot

I will try to add more photos to this post as I scan them.

There will be plenty of new Leica M2 film photography example images coming soon. It really is a beautiful camera and my new favourite to operate of all my cameras. (Examples will include me using the Leica Summicron 50mm f2 v5 lens on the Bessa R3A in London that can be compared to the Leica M9 B&W images).

(The header image was shot in Edinburgh in 2013 with model Emma using the Bessa R3A + CV Nokton 40mm f1.4)

MatthewOsbornePhotography.co.uk – UK Leica Photographer

Kodak T-Max 100 Film

Kodak T-Max 100 (& T-Max 400) Film

I started getting into film photography during 2012 and I was using the classic black and white film, Ilford FP4+. For 2013 I tried Kodak T-Max film and liked this modern emulsion using T-grain for finer more grain free results for scanning. I used 35mm T-Max 100 in my Nikon FM and Voigtlander Bessa R3A rangefinder and 120 Kodak T-Max 400 (& 100) in my medium format cameras. I tried different formats – 6×4.5 (Contax 645), 6×6 (ARAX-CM (Kiev 88)), 6×7 (Mamiya RZ 67 Pro II) and 6×9 (Moskva-5 folding camera).

I develop my own black and white film using Xtol and/or Rodinal and often via stand development. It is very easy and allows you to develop the film to get the look you desire. This is not possible if you send film to a lab. You do not need a dark room, just a ‘Paterson tank’.

For colour film photography I use mostly Kodak Portra 400 for medium format and Kodak Portra 160 for 35mm. (See blog link below).

Here are some shots from 2013 to show the look obtainable from Kodak T-Max film.

35mm 135 Kodak T-Max 100 Film (Voigtlander Bessa R3A)

FilmIsNotDead
Edinburgh
Voigtlander Color Skopar 21mm f4
35mm Kodak T-Max 100

120 Kodak T-Max 100 & 400 Film
Contax 645
Contax 645 B&W Wedding Photography
Contax 645 Asian Wedding
Contax 645 Wedding Photography
Contax 645 Wedding
Bridal Photography on Film
Gina with Contax 645
The Dancer - Rodinal Stand Development
ARAX-CM (Kiev 88)
Fashion on FILM
Model Photographer - Film Photography
NT Packwood House Estate
ARAX Landscape
Film Photography
India Street Food (1)
Mamiya RZ67
All Stars with Mamiya RZ67
Nella!
Fashion on Film
Film Fashion Photography
Black & White Film Wedding Photography
Engagement Shoot Film Photography
Model Photography on Film
Evening Stroll
Sex Sells..Film
Moskva-5
Russian Moskva-5 Folding Camera
Moskva-5
Russian Moskva-5 6x9 Folding Camera

Leica M9 CCD Sensor vs. Film
The filmic look of the Leica M9 CCD sensor really threatened my continued use of using 35mm black and white film. I stopped shooting film for over 3 months once the M9 arrived. I then found time to develop some film from the Voigtlander Bessa R3A that I shot before buying the M9. The results have fully restored my faith in film. I like the imperfections and arty feel that true film photography can capture. For 2014 I look forward to using my new Leica lenses on my Bessa R3A alongside my Leica M9. I also bought Mamiya RZ 645 film back, Mamiya RZ 6×6 film back and a Mamiya RZ Polaroid film back so the future for film looks bright for 2014!

MatthewOsbornePhotography.co.uk

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