Hasselblad XPan in NYC (II)

Hasselblad XPan in NYC (II)

Matthew Osborne Photography / Mr Leica

February 2016

 

Hasselblad XPan

For my second NYC photography workshop in January 2016 I focused on using available light on location to light a model. This was normally daylight during the day then any existing light sources we could find for the night shoots.  I chose not to carry lights and the heavier bulkier Hasselblad 501 medium format camera and instead took my new Hasselblad Xpan 35mm panoramic rangefinder camera.

The Hasselblad XPan has panoramic mode (24x65mm) and shoots two 35mm frames side by side and also the standard film negative size of 35mm (24x35mm). Here are some examples using the Hasselblad XPan in New York split by film stock.

XPan Panoramic Mode (24x65mm):

35mm Kodak Eastman Double-X (5222) / Cinestill BWXX

Hasselblad XPan + BWXX
Hasselblad XPan Panoramic Landscape
Hasselblad XPan + Cinestill BWXX
Cinematic Look - Hasselblad XPan
Hasselblad XPan NYC
Cinestill BWXX / Double-X 5222
Day Dreamer  - BWXX in NYC
Hasselblad XPan Street Photography
XPan City Lights

35mm Kentmere 100 Film

Brooklyn Bridge New York Panoramic
Brooklyn Bridge XPan Panoramic
Hasselblad XPan NYC Cityscape
Brooklyn Bridge - Xpan 2
Hasselblad Xpan Testing

35mm Cinestill 800T Film

XPan + Cinestill 800T Portrait
Cinestill 800T Film Landscape
Hasselblad XPan + Cinestill 800T

35mm Kodak Portra 400 Film

Hasselblad XPan Portra Portrait
Hasselblad XPan Cityscape
Hasselblad XPan 45mm
XPan in New York
Hasselblad XPan in NYC

 

XPan Standard (Crop) Mode (24x35mm):

35mm Kodak Eastman Double-X (5222) / Cinestill BWXX

Hasselblad XPan 35mm Portrait + BWXX
Hasselblad XPan 90mm Portrait
Hasselblad XPan 90mm Portrait

35mm Cinestill 800T Film

Hasselblad XPan 90mm Portrait

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Hasselblad Portraits – B&W (NYC I)

Hasselblad Portraits – B&W (NYC I)

Matthew Osborne Photography / Mr Leica

January 2016

In December 2015 I took my Hasselblad 501C medium format film camera to teach a 1-2-1 model photography workshop for a week in New York.  I took two Hasselblad lenses; a Zeiss Sonnar 150mm f4 CF lens and a Zeiss Distagon 60mm f3.5 CF lens.  I took all photos on 120 Kodak Tri-X 400 film which was then developed at home in Xtol and scanned with an Epson v800 flatbed scanner.

Hasselblad Portraits - B&W

Hasselblad Portraits

Here is a selection of 6×6 Hasselblad portraits from the models we worked with on the first of two photography workshop weeks in New York.  Click any photos for more details about the model, lens and developing.

Manhattan Bridge
New York Model - Hasselblad
Hasselblad Portrait Session
Hasselblad 501C + Tri-X
Hasselblad Indoor Shoot
Hasselblad / Sonnar Portrait
Sonnar Lens Flare
Hasselblad Distagon 60mm Portrait
Window Light Hasselblad Shoot
Hasselblad Sonnar 150 Bokeh
Hasselblad 60mm Distagon Portrait
Hasselblad / Tri-X Portrait
Kodak Tri-X 400@200
Chains
Hasselblad 60mm Distagon Portrait
Hasselblad Shoot NYC
Hasselblad Sonnar 150 Porrtrait
New York Model
Kodak Tri-X 400@800
Hasselblad Film Portrait
Hasselblad Distagon 60mm Portrait
Hasselblad + Sonnar Portrait
Hasselblad Sonnar 150 f4
Hasselblad Sonnar Fashion
Hasselblad Model NYC

Hasselblad Camera

I have used and still use many different film cameras and digital cameras and I think my 500 Series Hasselblad is the best of the best.  I enjoy using the Hasselblad and I love how it makes and ordinary scene look really special with minimal effort. Some of my film photos may look perhaps over edited but in reality all I do is adjust contrast, sharpness and remove dust specks to the majority.  The Hasselblad does the rest.

I do like the small size and convenience of Leica cameras (as seen on the second NYC workshop) but when I revisit Hasselblad portrait photos I think the extra effort involved is more than repaid by higher image quality.  By this I mean the weight and bulk of the Hasselblad camera (and if I use a monopod too) is worth the effort as I get higher resolution images from the medium format film and Zeiss lens combination.  Medium format gives me sharper sharp areas and softer soft areas next to each other all in the same photo.  With 35mm I can have soft or sharp, not both in the same image.  The Hasselblad XPan 35mm rangefinder camera bridges the gap with resolution to match a 6×7 panoramic 120 film image yet shot on 35mm film.  An awesome combination that you will see much more of!

Colour film Hasselblad portrait photos still to come from NYC plus all those photos with the Leica M3, M6, M8 and XPan on the second trip.

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New York Photography Workshop (2)

New York Photography Workshop (2)

Matthew Osborne Photography / Mr Leica

January 2016

Brooklyn Bridge New York Panoramic

New York Trip

As crazy as it sounds, I was back out teaching model photography in New York again this week. I’d never visited NYC before then to go twice within 4-5 weeks was quite a surprise! I feel very fortunate that was asked to go once let alone twice.

For my first workshop in New York I was teaching model photography using speedlights on location (mostly) and with iconic landmark backdrops (mostly). For this second NYC photography workshop I focused on using available light on location to light a model. This was normally daylight during the day then any existing light sources we could find for the night shoots.  It is one skill to create light but another to see existing light and visualize how it could light a model. This time we did not have to carry lights and stands so could work faster and lighter. With that intention, I decided to leave my beloved Hasselblad 501C medium format camera and monopod behind and instead used all rangefinder film cameras.

The recent purchase of my new Hasselblad Xpan 35mm panoramic rangefinder camera was no coincidence. I bought it quickly so I was able to take it with me to New York. On the first trip to New York I shot 6×6 film with the Hasselblad 501C and digital photography with the Leica M 240. I have been less than impressed recently with the Leica M240 CMOS sensor images for my model photography so decided to leave it behind and packed the older Leica M8 instead.

Camera Bag

  • Leica M8 digital camera body
  • Leica M6 film camera body
  • Leica M3 film camera body
  • Leica Summilux ASPH 50mm f1.4 lens
  • Voiglander Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 lens
  • Voiglander Color Skopar 35mm f2.5 lens
  • Zeiss Biogon 25mm f2.8 lens
  • Voigtlander Super Wide Heliar 15mm f4.5 lens
  • Hasselblad XPan film camera body
  • Hasselblad XPan 45mm f4 lens
  • Hasselblad XPan 90mm f4 lens
  • Fuji GA645 medium format film camera

35mm Film

Amongst the high rise buildings of New York there is often less light when compared to say the open beach location I shoot at in Poland. As such I only shot one roll of ISO 100 film and that was on the last day photographing Brooklyn Bridge. For colour film I shot mostly 35mm Kodak Portra 400 and some old Fujicolor C200 plus a roll of Cinestill 800T. For black and white film I shot almost entirely with Kodak Eastman Double-X 5222 (aka Cinestill BWXX film), at both ISO 400 and ISO 800. Excited to see the results from all of the above!

Hasselblad XPan

I was super excited to try the new Hasselblad XPan 35mm film panoramic rangefinder camera. I bought the 45mm f4 and 90mm f4 XPan lenses. There is also a 30mm XPan lens but it is quite pricey and wider than I normally need.

Many purists write you should only shoot the XPan in panoramic mode (and not the standard single 35mm frame mode). To an extend I agree but in a real world situation and when traveling reasonably light the 90mm lens shot in standard mode makes for a nice portrait lens. I normally use and carry 35mm and 50mm lenses on the Leica cameras so the Hasselblad XPan 90mm gives me more reach and compression if needed.

The Hasselblad XPan is compact and easy to use. It is about the same weight as Leica camera body and lens but a little wider. I relied on the XPan light meter and used perhaps 50:50 the 45mm and 90mm lenses.

My only small complaint and observation at this stage with the XPan is if I load film and then want to change to a different film mid roll I can’t manually rewind so as such the film rewinds fully into the 35mm film canister. I then need a film retriever to pull the film leader back out so it can be used again. I realize it is probably not normal to swap film in a camera mid roll but I do it a lot with the Leica (and Nikon) film cameras.

Leica M8

I realized I don’t use my Leica M8 often enough. I enjoyed the crop factor that lets me focus tighter for portraits and the rich CCD sensor colours. I shot the M8 similar to my Leica film cameras so used it at a ‘normal’ ISO range (ISO 160-640 on the M8 range). I also enjoyed the sharper M8 images vs the M240 and Leica M9.  The M8 is still king for digital B&W photos for me (of the cameras I have owned).

Leica M6 and Leica M3

I took the Leica M3 and Leica M6 film cameras so could load one body with colour film and one body with black and white.  As it happened having the Hasselblad XPan too (and keen to use it) meant I did not need 3x 35mm film cameras.  As such after the first roll of colour film in the M3 I then left it out my bag for the rest of the workshop. I enjoyed using the Leica M6 and built in light meter and did not use my handheld Sekonic light meter at all meaning I can travel lighter still and work fast.  I also made use of the Leica M6 35mm framelines and swapped between 50mm and 35mm with the Leica M8.

Fuji GA645

I packed the lightweight and compact medium format Fuji GA645 as I thought I would miss the larger film format.  I only took a single photo and I think that was a cityscape!

Conclusion

It was nice to work lighter and faster due to a combination of small cameras with built in light meters and using available light on location.  I did do some strobist work in the apartment for an evening shoot to give a Hollywood glamour styling lighting with a single speedlight and DIY light modifiers only.  We experienced a 50-60% cancellation rate from the models again but with a lot of emailing we still had models each day to shoot with.  A big thank you to models Aubrey, Sara, Olly, Cat, Laura and Rozi for joining us.

Photography Workshops 2016

In 2014 I was teaching mostly in the UK and ran some small group workshops in London.  For 2015 I concentrated on teaching 1-2-1 photography tuition and taught both in the UK but also in Zurich, New York and Amsterdam.

For 2016 I will continue to teach 1-2-1 photography sessions both overseas and at home as requested.  Photography workshop costs vary on a number of factors so I now address each on a as requested basis.  I am happy to travel globally as long as the travel costs are covered.

For those of you that are unsure, I am normally asked to teach model photography workshops which includes providing the model(s) and showing you how I use light to illuminate the model on location.  I shoot both film and digital Leicas during the workshops but you can use whatever camera you normally use.

My website link below has a list of some of the photography topics you may want to cover during the workshop and each course is bespoke to your needs.

http://matthewosbornephotography.co.uk/Photography-Courses.html

NYC (II) Photos

I will post some of the New York photography workshop photos once processed.   Due to the different cameras I was using I will share posts by camera rather than all together.  Posts to follow include:

  • Leica M8 in NYC
  • Hasselblad XPan in NYC
  • Leica M6 in NYC

Here is a sample! Aubrey with my Leica M8

1-2-1 photography workshop - NYC

I still have the NYC (I) Hasselblad 501C photos to share.  I now have the colour film back from the lab so will share some 6×6 negative scans soon!

Sample! Tegan with the Hasselblad 501C

Hasselblad + Ektar Portrait

 

 

Hasselblad XPan!

Hasselblad XPan 35mm Camera

Matthew Osborne Photography / Mr Leica

January 2016

2015 ended on a real high after buying my Hasselblad 501C in September. It was the camera that was giving me the most enjoyment and arguably also the best pictures I had ever taken.

Hasselblad XPan!

I read a lot and am always getting new ideas as to what I want to try next and what direction I want to go with my photography. I am the eternal optimist so often the grand ideas lead to disappointment in reality once I try a certain camera for a particular idea. One early example was to use two Kiev 88 film cameras for wedding photography. I got the cameras but by that time my experience and knowledge had moved on and a new idea was brewing. Leica cameras were on the horizon. I flip flop from the high quality medium format negative size to the speed and portability of 35mm. Neither are the perfect solution but both have their strengths.

I love the Hasselblad 501C camera for built quality, lenses and its large negative size. I also love my new 35mm Leica M6 for the build quality, lenses, portability and light meter. What would happen if I could combine both cameras? Please let me introduce you to the Hasselblad XPan!

Hasselblad XPan

I had never considered buying a Hasselblad XPan camera before nor had ever had any interest towards them. The XPan came to me almost by accident in my reading for my next grand idea. Within a 48hr period of comparing many other cameras I had introduced myself to the XPan, learnt the major pros and cons, got up to speed on how the XPan photos look and then purchased one.

I will be open and say I very nearly bought a Mamiya 7ii instead. The three things that stopped me getting the Mamiya 7 were the higher cost (with a wide lens), the similarities to my existing Fuji GF670 and the fact that I’m not a big 6×7 film format fan (yet). I love composing with 6×6 and feel 645 film is a big enough jump up from 35mm. I’m not sure I need 6×7.

The Hasselblad XPan is a 35mm rangefinder camera like my Leicas but comes in a titanium – aluminium body.  The XPan has a built in light meter like the Leica M6 and like all Leica M cameras is a coupled rangefinder camera system with interchangeable lenses. The XPan has the solid (built like a tank) feel and build quality of a Hasselblad 500 series camera and the small form factor of a Leica. Leica M cameras are ‘limited’ by the maximum film negative size of 35mm (24x35mm). The Hasselblad XPan however has panoramic mode (24x65mm) and shoots two 35mm frames side by side to make a negative almost two times larger . As such a 45mm lens equates to roughly a 25mm lens yet with zero distortion at the edges as it is a 45mm lens. A larger negative also gives a greater shallow depth of field so the 90mm f4 lens actually looks more like perhaps an f2 lens with beautifully graduated background and foreground separation. At first glance the Hasselblad XPan looks to be a very well designed camera with a PC sync port, a shutter release cable port, spirit level supplied as standard, the ability to switch between normal 35mm mode and P for panoramic mode mid roll, a basic LCD with battery life and exposures remaining all in a very neat and compact camera. The only negative I read and have seen is the paint flakes off the body easily.

The Hasselblad XPan was a joint venture and made in collaboration with Fujifilm. The Fuji TX-1 / TX-2 are the Fujifilm badged version. There was a similar collaborate to Zeiss and Fujifilm who co-made my Fuji GF670 camera.

So what does the Hasselblad XPan bring? I look forward to the challenge of shooting and composing the panoramic images especially for my model photography where it is seen less often. I don’t take many landscape photos but if I did this would certainly be an amazing travel companion. I look forward to trying the XPan for street photography and also for wedding photography. It has the benefits of a Leica in that I can work fast and travel light. Any camera that lets me do this normally gets to travel more and work more than my bigger cameras. The large format 4×5 cameras for example have never been out the UK.

I will take my new Hasselblad XPan camera on my next model photography trip and see what I can do. The resulting images will certainly be something fresh for my Flickr feed and Instagram.

Teaser – Hasselblad Xpan + 45mm f4 lens + Kentmere 100 film

Brooklyn Bridge New York Panoramic