Lomography.com – Petzval 85 Art

Lomography.com – Petzval 85 Art

Matthew Osborne Photography/ @MrLeicaCom

September 2016

 

Petzval 85 Art Lens – Nikon F Mount

The lovely people at Lomography.com kindly got in touch and lent me their Nikon mount brass Petzval 85 Art lens to try.  Below is a link describing how I got on and here are some example images with Sophie and Charlotte (also included in link).  All photos taken with my old Nikon D800.

..I have to say, the Petzval 85 Art makes Nikon D800 photos interesting so it’s good! (I say that as I struggled to get excited with my Nikon D800 photos on the whole hence my move to film and Leicas).

Petzval 85 Art

Sophie
Nikon D800 + Petzval 85
Petzval 85 Art
Nikon D800 + Petzval 85 Art Lens Brass
Petzval Bokeh
Nikon D800 + Petzval 85
Nikon D800 + Petzval 85 Art

Charlotte
Petzval 85
Petzval 85 Art Lens
Nikon D800 + Petzval 85
New Petzval 85 Art Lens Brass

Lomography.com Magazine – MrLeica.com

Link – https://www.lomography.com/magazine/323494-matt-osbourne-portraits-with-the-petzval-85

Petzval 85 vs. Other Nikon Mount Fast Lenses

When using the Petzval 85 lens it reminded me of the overly soft photos captured from my Nikkor 50mm f1.2 Ai-s lens when shooting at f1.2. Here are a few examples as a comparison. I think the Petzval 85 is sharper wide open at f2.2 and has ‘better’ bokeh (meaning more character).

Nikkor 50mm f1.2 Ai-s

Nikon D800 Headshot
Alice with Nikkor 50/1.2 AIS
Katie SOOC with 50/1.2 AIS @f1.2

I then thought perhaps the Samyang 85mm f1.4 would be more comparable so here are a few samples. The Samyang 85 is pretty sharp wide open at f1.4 and a great lens but I think again the Petzval 85 lens bokeh has more character.

Samyang 85mm f1.4

Innocence?
2012 REPOST: Nikon D800 + Samyang 85mm f1.4 Fashion
Harriett
Nikon FM

Petzval 85 vs. Leica M Fast Lenses

Finally, as a Leica photographer it seems only right to include a few example photos with fast Leica lenses that are also soft(ish) focus shot wide open.  The obvious lenses that spring to mind that I own are the Leica Noctilux 50mm f1 and Leica Summarit 50mm f1.5.

Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 v2

Leica M9 Skin Tones
Leica M9 + Noctilux
Leica M9 + Noctilux
Leica M Typ 240 + Noctilux
Leica Noctilux Bokeh

Leica Summarit 50mm f1.5

Leica Summarit 50mm f1.5
Street Portrait
Leica Summarit 50mm f1.5
Retro Leica

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Size Matters – Voigtlander Nokton 35mm f1.4

Size Matters – Voigtlander Nokton 35mm f1.4 MC

Matthew Osborne Photography

As my photography ‘matures’ different things become important to me.  In the earlier years bigger was best.  I remember getting my first big lens, the Nikkor 80-200  f2.8 AF, and suddenly I felt like a ‘Pro’ when at family weddings as all ‘Pros’ have big cameras and big lenses don’t they?!  I then up’d my game and got myself a Nikkor 200mm f2 AI-s prime lens.  Now that is a proper lens and it makes you look more like the paparazzi than a wedding photographer.

All that was a few years back.  Now I use Leica M cameras (+ medium format / large format film) and the opposite mentality applies.  Smaller and more compact is best (for me).  I have touched on this before but I am finding I am turning into more and more of a purest, with regards to my Leica M film cameras especially.  I only want to use 50mm lenses on the Leica M3 (with it’s 50mm viewfinder) and I only ‘want’ to use 35mm lenses on the Leica M2 (with 35mm viewfinder).  That is all well and good but the chosen lens needs to meet my requirements too.  There is no point me having a small camera if I then hang a big lens on the front to imbalance it.  Similarly, there is no point me putting a tiny lens on the camera if it cannot produces images that I ‘demand’.  Therefore I need to find a happy medium / middle ground that ticks most of my boxes.

50mm (Leica M3) – My preferred lens is the 50mm Leica Summicron f2 v5 lens as it is  smaller than the Summilux ASPH.  I do use the Summilux if I need to work in low light and with colour film that I cannot push as easily. Black and white film is easier as I just develop as I need.

35mm (Leica M2) – I didn’t have a 35mm lens that I was 100% happy with.

35mm lens I have are:

  • Voigtlander Nokton 35mm f1.2 ASPH ii lens which is very capable (and to me very usable shot wide open for paying clients) BUT all that comes at a cost. It is big and heavy.  I think of it as my 35mm Noctilux with some slight similarities in certain conditions.
  • Voigtlander Color Skopar 35mm f2.5 Pii is perhaps my smallest lens but with an f2.5 widest aperture is not bright enough for many of my available light photoshoots.
  • Leica Summaron 35mm f3.5 – low contrast slow ‘fun’ lens. Not for serious work but great for personal work

New 35mm I considered:

  • Older Leica Summilux 35mm f1.4 Pre-ASPH
  • Older Leica Summicron 35mm f2 Pre-ASPH
  • Newer Leica Summilux 35mm f1.4 ASPH
  • Newer Leica Summicron 35mm f2 ASPH
  • Zeiss ZM Biogon 35mm f2 T
  • Zeiss ZM Distagon 35mm f1.4 T
  • Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 SC
  • Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 MC

I spent a fair bit of time reviewing images from the Leica lenses and Voigtlander lenses.  I was happy size wise with all the Leicas and the Noktons.  They are all tiny lenses and all built to a similar high standard.  I ruled the Zeiss ZM lenses out immediately due to their bigger size.  I already have sharp 35mm lenses if size is no issue.  I am not normally a pixel peeper but I read a few reviews of the Leicas vs the Voigtlanders and yes the new Leica lenses are sharper but I bet 99% of the population could not tell images from these lenses apart once they had received basic editing.  The little Voigtlander ‘Classic’ as it is called is not perfect by any means.  I know as I have a Voigtlander Nokton Classic 40mm f1.4 already that I got on my Voigtlander Bessa R3A (that has 40mm framelines).  Going back to the purest thing briefly, I could easily use the 40/1.4 on the M2 and I have done but I am not satisfied to guess between 35mm or 50mm framelines for the 40mm crop.  I can’t compose precisely on film if I am guessing the crop / composition.

Nokton 35mm f1.4v2

The Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 MC is not perfect as it is less sharp wide open vs new Leica lenses (in tests done by others), has heavier vignetting at wider apertures, gives soft focus corners to images wide open, has distortion so a straight line becomes slightly curved in a photo, has ‘harsh’ bokeh with highlight edges to the circles, lacks the flare resistance of modern Leica lenses, and often has some focus shift issues (f2-f4 approx).  On the upside, the colours are better (more saturated) than the cooler colours of Leica glass, I like the harsh bokeh, I like vignetting, I like soft corners for portraits, I don’t mind a glow from slight flare and I plan to use it at f1.4 so am not worried about shift.  Better still you can buy a new Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 for about half the price of an old Leica 35mm lens and about 4 times cheaper than a new 35mm Leica Summicron ASPH /Summilux ASPH.  I was tempted to buy Leica but the older lenses are at least as soft as the Nokton wide open (it seems) and the Nokton has character rather than being clinical like the new Leica lenses (like my 50mm Summilux ASPH).  To me the Voigtlander 35mm 1.4 is like a mini Noctilux in that it is the imperfections and low light ability that attract me most of all.  I have had some great results with the 40mm Nokton so that helped my decision to buy a 35mm Nokton.

I bought the MC (multi-coated) version rather than the SC (single coated) as it has slightly less flare and more contrast.  People often say SC is best for black and white film and MC for colour film.  As I develop my own B&W film I control the contrast when I develop the film so I can easily develop film to be less constrasty if I need to retain more shadow detail.  On the whole it is better for me to have high contrast and more apparent sharpness in camera from the lens so I chose the MC.  The Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 MC will now spend it’s days on my Leica M2 for my ultimate travel companion and to pair with the Leica M3 + 50mm setup.

What triggered this purchase?

I was shooting in London yesterday and had my Leica M3, Leica M2 and Leica M9 cameras.  I had the 40mm Nokton on the M2 and it fit like a glove.  With the leather hand strap it was the perfect street photographer camera. Very minimal and HCB like!  I then decided to take the Summilux off the Leica M3 to ‘borrow’ it on the M2 as I knew it was sharper.  The size of the Summilux just ruined the whole feel of the camera and experience in general.  I got home and thought to myself, I need a low light 35mm lens that is as small as the 40mm Nokton.  I like the size of the 50mm Summicron but sometimes have to use the ‘Lux if low light.

I have also recently being tempted by 28mm lenses such as the Leica 28mm Summicron f2 or Leica Elmarit 28mm f2.8. I am most tempted buy the Elmarit for the M9 due to it’s compactness as the Leica M9 has 28mm framelines and I can adjust the ISO if need more light.  That would be perfect for a compact digital travel camera setup but for my usual work, portraits and low light weddings I needed a faster lens and not quite as wide. 50mm is still my go to focal length for portraits but 35mm is good for environmental portraits, wedding photography, street photography and when working in tighter spaces.

Here are a few sample images using the Voigtlander Nokton Classic 40mm f1.4 to give an idea of what images may look like

Leica M9 B&W Portrait

Leica M9 Fashion

Voigtlander Bessa R3A Portrait

Ukraine

Leica, Ukraine

Leica M2 + Nokton 40mm + B&W Film

Voigtlander Nokton 40mm f1.4

CV Nokton 40mm f1.4 Bokeh

Leica Portrait

Leica M9 Fashion

..As you may imagine I am not too concerned that the 35mm Nokton is not sharp enough or has a list of other failings.  It’s 40mm sibling seems to do OK 🙂

Zeiss ZM Biogon 25mm f2.8

Zeiss ZM Biogon 25mm f2.8 T* – Leica M mount
Matthew Osborne Photography

Carl-Zeiss-Biogon-T-25mm-f2.8-ZM

My latest purchase is a Zeiss ZM Biogon 25mm f2.8 lens. At my last wedding I spent much of the day swapping between a Voigtlander Ultron 28mm f2 and Zeiss ZM Biogon 21mm f2.8 on my Leica M9 for wide angle photos. I enjoy documentary wedding photography where people are captured interacting and shown within their environment. In contrast, for my model photography and portraiture when there is only one subject I often like to isolate by subjects with tight crops and/ or a shallow depth of field.  For indoor wedding photography such as for some of my last wedding in the Peak District I often found the 21mm ZM Biogon a little too wide and the 28mm Ultron too close to 35mm, being too narrow. The ZM Biogon 21mm and 25mm are sharper than the f2 Ultron and more similar to the sharpness of the 15mm Voigtlander Super Wide Heliar. I used to enjoy the 24mm focal length on my Nikon D800 using a Nikkor 24mm f2.8 prime. I have most focal lengths in Leica M mount but nothing between 21mm and 28mm.

Leica 24mm f2.8 Elmarit-M vs. Zeiss ZM Biogon 25mm f2.8

There is actually three 24mm-25mm Leica M lens options –

  • Leica 24mm f2.8 Elmarit-M costing £2200 weighing 290g and with an E55 filter
  • Zeiss ZM Biogon 25mm f2.8 costing £900 weighing 260g and with a 46mm thread
  • Leica 24mm f1.4 Summilux ASPH costing around £4700 weighing 468g

The Leica Lux 24mm is beyond my budget and I don’t think I would be willing to spend over £2K on a wide angle lens as a portrait photographer. I therefore had two options, a used Leica Elmarit 24mm f2.8 or for less money a new Zeiss ZM Biogon 25mm f2.8. I have no loyalty to Leica lenses and do love the contrasty punchy images from Zeiss glass. If the Elmarit and the Biogon were the same price new I would choose the ZM Biogon as the ZM 46mm filter thread fits in with my existing lenses and filters (excluding the Noctilux and 90mm Cron that are larger than 52mm). I use step up filter rings for lenses from 39mm-52mm to use 52mm filters.

I am hoping the Zeiss ZM Biogon 25mm f2.8 lens will replace two lenses in my camera bag, the 21mm and 28mm. The 28mm has already replaced my 35mm for most weddings so my new wedding lens trio would then be 25mm, 50mm, 90mm for focal lengths but take the 75mm for detail photos. For a two lens setup I would use the 25mm and 75mm Cron APO for a super sharp lens combo on two Leica M bodies. For a one camera one lens setup I tend favour the 50mm focal length over 35mm, hence my Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 weddings.

Sample images coming soon! 🙂
Matt

Related Posts

2x Leica M9’s, 50mm Redundant

2x Leica M9’s, 50mm Redundant – First Wedding with 2 Leica M9 Cameras!

Matt Osborne (“Mr Leica”)

On Saturday I covered Dutch photographer and fellow Leica M9 shooter Patrick and his now wife Sam’s wedding at Upper House, Hayfield in the Peak District.  Patrick is a successful architect with a keen eye for detail so the pressure was really on this time!

Wedding Photography – One Camera

I normally shoot with a single Leica M9 and have a Nikon D800 in the car as a back up camera.  Using one Leica M body keeps things simple and me nice and mobile.  For the last few weddings I used the 50mm Leica Noctilux f1.0 as my main lens for as much of the day as possible shooting it wide open.  I have a Leica M8 but the rangefinder suddenly shifted out of focus six months plus ago so it is currently out of action.  The only problem with one camera and prime lenses is if I want to quick do a wide shot then say a telephoto shot such as during speeches or the first dance I have to quickly change lenses.  Although this can be done very quickly and on the go there is always a chance I might miss something.

Wedding Photography – Two Camera Bodies

As I knew Patrick also had a Leica M9 body I asked if I could use it for the day to give me two Leica M9 cameras and a similar setup to what I used in my pre-Leica days when I used a Nikon D800 and a Nikon D700.  Patrick agreed so I was all set for the day.  I knew the indoor photos would be in some tight spaces so wanted wide angle lenses on one body and then telephoto lens on the other to get closer to the action when I wasn’t able to on foot.

Lens Choice (for the 95% of the day*)

Camera 1 (M9)

  • 21mm – Carl Zeiss Biogon 21mm f2.8
  • 28mm – Voigtlander Ultron 28mm f2

Camera 2 (M9)

  • 75mm – Leica Summicron 75mm f2 APO
  • 90mm – Leica Summicron 90mm f2 Pre-ASPH

*There were a few photos taken with the Voigtlander Nokton 35mm f1.2 ASPH and some also with the Leica Summilux ASPH 50mm f1.4.

Verdict

When using one camera for wedding photography my most used focal length is 50mm, then followed by 35mm.  When I had two camera bodies for a wedding both of these FL were hardly used.  I really enjoyed the 28f2 / 90f2 combo for much of the day and I think I kept the ISO on both cameras at ISO 200 all day despite it being typical overcast British weather.  I am happy using slow shutter speeds and enjoy using off camera lighting.

Anything else new?

Yes, my style continues to evolve.  For my last 2 or 3 Leica weddings shot over the summer I used my Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 wide open for much of the day.  That followed the same style of my model photography that was also taken at the widest lens apertures to give the shallow depth of field look.  Recently, and perhaps since getting my Leica Summicron 75mm f2 APO I have started to enjoy stopping my lenses down my lenses to give sharper results.  The model photography photos take on more of a fashion look in my eyes when they are sharper.  I often use any apertures from f2.8 to f11 depending on the lens. The lens I stop down the most is the Leica Elmar 135mm f4 as it can be softer at wider apertures.  This was the first wedding since my current taste had changed so many of the photos were shot at f2.8-f5.6 on the day where in the past I aimed to shoot wide open as much as possible.

Here is the first sample from Sam and Patrick’s wedding, taken of the beautiful Sam just before she met her Dad to walk down the isle.

Leica Wedding

Would I buy a second Leica M9 for weddings?

Not at this stage but I think I will get my Leica M8 repaired and use that as my second Leica M body for wide angle shots.  The 1.33x crop factor of the M8 would make my Zeiss Biogon 21/2.8 the equivalent of a 28mm f2.8 lens on the M9 which is perfect for my needs.  This is what I started to do when I first bought the M8.

See my Leica weddings and engagement photography on my sister site, http://www.LeicaWeddingPhotographer.co.uk

Leica ASPH & APO lenses. Do we really need them?

Leica ASPH & APO lenses. Do we really need them?

Matthew Osborne Photography

Model shoot using vintage Leica pre-ASPH/ pre-APO and third party lenses

For the September 2014 London Photography Workshop model shoot I decided to take the oppotunity to pack the follow vintage camera lenses for the day.  I would be teaching flash photography and portraiture so I can do this with lenses from any era.  It’s great to shoot with one lens on the camera all day but sometimes I just want to go longer or wider so I decided on –

  • Leica M9 camera body
  • 35mm –   1953 Leica Summaron 35mm f3.5
  • 52mm – 1950s Russian Industar 26M 52mm f2.8 *
  • 90mm – 1973 Leica Summicron 90mm f2 pre-ASPH **

*I have a 1951 Leica Summarit 50mm f1.5 lenses but I prefer it in lower light.
** My 1960s Leica Elmar 135mm f4 is also a fantastic lens but I did’t want to carry two telephoto lenses.

Plus less vintage extras..

  • 1x Speedlight
  • 15mm Voigtlander Super Wide Heliar f4.5
  • Fuji GF670 Medium Format Film Camera

The workshop

Tom booked me for a day of 1-2-1 photography tuition and I invited Latvian model Lauma to join us as our model.  I have shot with Lauma once before but last time it was with available light only.  This time I was teaching off camera flash photography and portrait lighting so I was in my element. All photos were taken using a single bare speedlight without any light modifiers.

Portrait Photography Workshop

All a myth!

The workshop day proved two common photography theories wrong.

  • We don’t need the latest Leica lenses to get great pictures on a Leica M camera body
  • We don’t need fancy light modifiers and ETTL speedlights

Am I guilty of believing all the ‘hype’? Yes of course I am!

I own the Leica Summilux ASPH 50mm f1.4 (“Lux”) and the Leica Summicron 75mm f2 APO (“Cron”).  I bought the 50mm Lux as my first Leica 50mm lenses because of the glowing reviews but find I rarely use it as prefer other 50s.  I bought the 75mm Cron because of the magnification it could produce focusing at 0.7m rather than anything else. The 75f2 focal length has become one of my favourite portrait lenses and my go to detail lens for Leica weddings.
I write ‘hype’ as yes both ASPH and APO lenses are technically brilliant but you dont ‘need’ them as such to get a nice image.  I own both new and old Leica lenses but if I was someone trying to get into the Leica market I think potential buyers should not rule out the older glass.

Photos with vintage Leica M mount lenses

Here are some recent examples images using vintage lenses on a Leica M9 camera from flash photography portrait workshops both in London and at my Coventry studio.  Models are Gina, Roisin and Lauma.

1953 Leica Summaron 35mm f3.5

Leica Summaron 35mm f3.5

1951 Leica Summarit 50mm f1.5

Leica Summarit 50mm f1.5 Portrait

Leica Summarit 50mm

1950s Russian Industar 26M 52mm f2.8

Leica M9 + Industar 26M 52mm f2.8

Industar 26M 52mm f2.8

1973 Leica Summicron 90mm f2 pre-ASPH

Cigarette Break

Beauty and a Geek!

Leica M9 + Summicron 90

Leica M9 + Vintage Leica Summicron 90mm f2

Leica M9 Strobist

1960s Leica Elmar 135mm f4

Modern Classic

Black and White Fashion

Leica Elmar 135mm f4

Leica Noctilux 50mm f0.95 vs f1.0

Leica Noctilux 50mm f0.95 vs f1.0
MatthewOsbornePhotography – Leica Photographer

Leica Noctilux 50mm f0.95 vs f1.0

I recently treated myself to a 1981 Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 v2. After now having the Nocti f1 a few weeks I have used it to shoot an entire wedding (Alexa & Rich in Warwickshire) and for a recent model photography / fashion shoot. It quickly became my favourite lens and the enjoyment it gives is in proportion to the high price tag. I use it at it widest aperture for everything and use ND filters if conditions are too bright to do so. I love how the older Noctilux draws and the low contrast soft looking images it produces. They are soft but still more than usuable for female portraiture.

Here are a few recent example images using the Leica M9 + 50mm f1.0
(All are Leica M9 in camera basic black and white JPEGs)
Leica vs Mamiya RZ!
Leica M9 B&W JPEG
Leica High Key Portrait
Noctilux Portrait

Leica B&W JPEG
Leica Fashion Photography

Leica M9 DNG B&W Conversions (as comparison – added after)

Leica M9 + Noctilux

Leica M9 B&W

On my last London Portrait Photography Workshop I was lucky enough to be able to borrow a copy of the latest Noctilux 50mm f0.95. The lens is sharp at f0.95 and has a look similar to the Leica Summilux ASPH 50mm f1.4 that I own. Here are example using the Nocti 50mm f0.95 on my M9 (M9 DNG files converted to B&W)
Leica Noctilux 50mm f0.95 Test Shot
Leica Noctilux f0.95
Portrait Photography Workshop
Leica Noctilux 50mm f0.95 Portrait
Leica Noctilux f0.95

So. Which lens do you prefer? Most ‘normal’ photographers that are striving for the highest possible sharpness and resolution, call it ‘perfection’ will probably chose the new Leica Noctilux 50mm f0.95. I am not the norm and without doubt chose the older Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 but for its ‘imperfection’.

Before I discovered photography (at the end of 2009) I used to channel my creativity into painting (watercolours on paper and acrylics on model figures). I think this partly is the reason why I enjoy arty less perfect photography such as soft focus images from the Nocti f1 and the imperfections captured when shooting film.

Here is some colourful bokeh from the Noctilux 50mm f1 at last weekends wedding. Wedding post to follow.

Leica Noctilux Bokeh

..it’s funny. I now own quite a few Leica mount lenses and I used to struggle to decide for each shoot what lens to use and if going out for a day which lenses to pack to take with me. Now I would be happy to go out for the day with one lens and never feel like I am missing out. I have the opposite problem of not wanting to take the Nocti 50mm f1 off the camera! 🙂

Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0

Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 v2 (1981)
MatthewOsbornePhotography – Leica Photographer

Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0

After getting the chance to try a new Leica Noctilux 50mm f0.95 lens during a London Photography Workshop a few weeks back I was excited for the arrival of my older Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0. I purchased the mint condition vintage Leica lens on eBay from ‘longmilan84’ (Long) who it based in Milan, Italy. Despite the worry of the high value purchase the transaction all went very smoothly and the lens arrived as described. Many thanks Long!

Leica Noctilux 50f1.0 for wedding photography?

I ordered the Nocti lens to arrive in time for a wedding booking last weekend. I used the Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 for wedding photography and was really pleased with the results. It is well documented that the f1.0 lens is much softer wide open the compared to the newer 50mm f0.95 but I was hoping to use this effect to my advantage. I relied on Leica m mount lenses I knew for the most part of the day (CV 35/1.2 ASPH + Leica Lux ASPH 50/1.4) but did use the Nocti at the end of the day and for arty ‘B roll’ style detail shots. Once I was confident with the results from the Noctilux for wedding photos I asked my next wedding couple in advance if I can use this lens for their wedding and they said yes! Great news! I now hope to use the Nocti as much as possible on the wedding day shot wide open throughout.

Here are some Noctilux wedding photo examples, all shot wide open at f1.0 on a Leica M9
Leica Noctilux Wedding
Noctilux Bokeh
Leica Nocitlux Bokeh
Leica Food Photography
Noctilux DOF
Leica Noctilux Bokeh
Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 Sharpness
Leica Look
Leica Nocti Wedding
Leica Noctilux Low Light

(I will share a separate blog post for the full wedding highlights including more Nocti photos)

Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 for Leica Studio Photography?
Yesterday I was teaching a photography and lighting workshop again in my Coventry studio giving photography tuition on how to use available light for portrait photography. Holly kindly modelled for me and here are a few samples of me using the Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 in the studio shot wide open on a Leica M9 camera body.
Leica Noctilux f1
Leica Noctilux Portrait

Did I like using the Nocti 50f1 in the studio?
I found I kept wanting to get closer than 1m to my model to give a tighter crop. The 50f1 will not focus closer than 1m so at times changed lenses to my Leica Summilux ASPH 50mm f1.4 that will focus as close as 0.7m. Here is a sample image using the Lux ASPH 50 as a comparison (on the M9) –
Leica Portrait

Initial thoughts.
I am very happy with the Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 purchase and I do not have the desire to upgrade to the newer f0.95. The Noctilux f0.95 gives a similar look to that from the Summilux ASPH 50 f1.4 but has the same drawback as the f1.0 in that you can only focus as close as 1m. If Leica released a new Noctilux with 0.7m focus distance I would be there in an instant! ..after robbing a bank en route! (joke – as I imagine it would be very expensive!)

I have not yet had chance to do a dedicated model / fashion photography shoot with the Leica Nocti as I have been teaching photography much more in recent weeks. That said, as soon as I do I will share the results. I am also really looking forward to all the Leica weddings booked for the year as I hope to sell them the Leica Noctilux look as I have for the next wedding. Wedding photography is no different to any of my other photography genre. If I can’t get excited when taking the photos I will not enjoy it and then I would stop doing it. The Leica Noctilux photos make the ordinary look extraordinary and that is what I want others to benefit from too.

MatthewOsbornePhotography.co.uk – Leica Wedding Photographer, Coventry

Related Links

> Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 (pre-arrival hype) – https://matthewosbornephotography.wordpress.com/2014/04/25/leica-noctilux-50/

> Leica Noctilux 50mm f0.95 (model photography workshop examples)
https://matthewosbornephotography.wordpress.com/2014/04/29/leica-noctilux-50mm-f0-95/

> Leica Summilux ASPH 50mm f1.4 (as a comparison)
https://matthewosbornephotography.wordpress.com/2013/12/19/leica-summilux-asph-50mm-f1-4/

> Coventry Wedding Photographer /Leica Wedding Photography http://www.matthewosbornephotography.co.uk/Wedding-Photographer.html

> Photography and Lighting Workshop / Portrait Photography Courses
http://www.matthewosbornephotography.co.uk/Photography-Courses.html