Hasselblad Fashion / Ektar – Poland

Hasselblad Fashion / Kodak Ektar Film – Poland

Matthew Osborne Photography / MrLeica.com

October 2015

Hasselblad Leica Fashion

Model photography location shoot – Sopot Beach, Poland

Models – Irmina @ Future Models and Marta (ex Malva Models)

Styling – Me (with help from the girls bringing the clothes / doing their own makeup)

Assistants – N/A

Camera gear – Hasselblad 501C + Zeiss Makro-Planar 120mm f4 lens + 81B warming filter + 120 Kodak Ektar 1oo film + daylight

Film Lab – AG Photographic, Birmingham UK ( C41 dev + Noritsu scan)

Hasselblad Fashion

Here is the results from a single roll of 120 Kodak Ektar 100 film shot in my Hasselblad film camera.  I am fast becoming a big fan of Kodak Ektar film and now often select it over Kodak Portra or Fuji Pro 400H film.  I like the saturated Ektar colours so planned this series of photos around the film I had loaded.

Big thanks to models Irmina and Marta.  More colour film photos to come from the Poland model photography trip from when I was shooting Kodak Portra film in the Hasselblad.  I will then have the Hasselblad black and white film photos to share too!

Thanks

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Leica M3 Bridal Session – Ukraine

Leica M3 Bridal Session – Ukraine

Matthew Osborne Photography / MrLeica.com

October 2015

Leica M240 Wedding

Bridal Photography

Bridal session photography is quite possible my favourite type of photography.  A mix of model photography, wedding photography and fashion photography with the best bits from each.  By that I mean a nice model in a beautiful wedding dress and where we have all the time we need to create hopefully beautifully crafted images without the pressures and time constraints of an actual wedding day. To then shoot it all on a film camera is then icing on the cake for me.  I prefer the look of film and hope to shoot a higher percentage of film at every wedding I cover going forward.

Bridal Fashion

Leica Wedding Photography / Film Wedding Photography

If every couple allocated at least one hour of their wedding day for me capture stylised wedding photos like this I would be a very happy man and I think the resulting images would result in a happy bride (bride and groom too depending who was in the photos).  Posing two people is often easier than one and a real bride and groom are on their wedding day high so that normally results in nice smiley natural looking wedding photos. Posing does not need to be a dirty word. It merely lets me place my bride and groom in the best possible light.

Bridal Fashion

For this bridal shoot in Ukraine I shot with available light only to be able to work quickly. I was using both the digital Leica M 240 and the Leica M3. For the second roll of film in the M3 most of the photos were taken within a space of five minutes.  It was my fastest roll of 35mm film shot to date as I wanted to make the most of the situation.  Beautiful and willing models, the flowers, the dress, the location all in a remote woodland clearing one afternoon in Ukraine after a mini road trip.  The bride(s) spoke little / no english but we still managed to get some nice photos with me directing with my hands and using body language. The first of two bridal shoots was with model Evgenia and I used AGFA Vista 200 Plus colour film (below).  I then did the shoot again with model Olga in the same dress using Kodak Tri-X 400 black and white film (not all scanned yet). Here is an example photo with model Olga in black and white.

Black and White Bridal Shoot

Hasselblad Wedding Photography

The Ukraine trip was pre-Hasselblad era so I had my Leica M3 35mm film camera, Leica Summicron 50mm f2 v5 lens and was shooting 35mm AGFA Vista 200 plus budget film.  I really like AGFA Vista film at the moment and prefer the more saturated look to that of Kodak Portra that can look a little flat.  I wish there was a 120 AGFA Vista film for me to use in my Hasselblad as there seems a real gap in the colour film available for 400 speed saturated film.  I need a Kodak Ektar 400 film ideally as I love the saturation from Kodak Ektar 100. Going forward my new Hasselblad 501C medium format film camera will be with me at all my weddings. It is not as fast to use as the Leica M3 rangefinder for film photography but the results are just amazing.

Bridal Photos

Without further ado here are the AGFA Vista colour film photos from the first bridal photography session shot with my recalibrated Leica M3 and model Evgenia.

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Ukraine Model Photography (II)

Leica M Typ 240 LCD

Leica M Typ 240 LCD

August 2015

Matthew Osborne Photography / Mr Leica . com

Just finished my first wedding with the Leica M Typ 240. What an amazing camera! I loved the M9 but the 240 is so nice for weddings. 📷 Blog to follow.. #leicam #leicam240 #leica #leicawedding #leicaweddingphotographer #weddingphotography #billingha

When buying the Leica M Typ 240 camera  I didn’t think for a minute that I would be be using the rear 3 inch LCD display for anything other than chimping and changing menu settings.

Leica M Rangefinder

I bought the Leica M camera as I enjoy using and get my best results from focusing with the Leica optical viewfinder (rangefinder focus system).  I now struggle to use a DSLR accurately with manual focus lenses.  I confidently focus my Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 v2 lens wide open via the rangefinder system.

I did my first Leica wedding with the M 240 camera rather than my usual Leica M9 (that I part exchanged in for the M).  I suddenly found the LCD had multiple advantages I had never really considered.  I am sure there are more but here are some features that I love about the Leica M 240 LCD.

6 Reasons why I Love the Leica M 240 LCD

  1. Gorrila Glass cover  – The Leica M LCD has super tough Gorrila Glass so it hopefully wont get chipped /cracked liked my old M9 LCD display.
  2. Exposure preview – Pressing the shutter button half way down on the Leica M gives an exposure preview via the LCD live view mode.  I am strange in that I normally guess my exposure, take a shot then adjust up or down as needed.  That is how I used the Leica M9.  The Leica M lets me preview the available light exposure so I can adjust as needed before taking a photo.  The only exception to this is when I am using a combination of strobes and continuous light when I would then do a test photo.
  3. Wide lens composition – With the Leica M9 I used auxillary external viewfinders for lenses wider than 28mm such as the Zeiss Biogon 21mm and 25mm f2.8 lenses and the Voigtlander Super Wide Heliar 15mm f4.5 lens.  For fast shooting I still use the external finders especially in bright conditions but the LCD live view now gives me an alternative option to compose wide lenses without needing an external finder if required.
  4. Shooting height, low and from the hip – I love the waist level viewfinders of my medium format cameras such as the Mamiya RZ 67  Pro II, Mamiya 645 Super and Rolleiflex SL66E.  I shoot low and from the waist with ease. It is not always practical to lie on a dirty floor to line up the optical rangefinder against the eye with a Leica M camera. The M 240 LCD live view lets me both compose but also focus when shooting above head height, waist level and low level too.
  5. Focusing lenses that needing recalibrating – Some of my older lenses need recalibrating to be able to focus them accurately via the Leica M rangefinder focusing system.  The LCD live view and focus peeking lets me focus any lenses accurately and easily.  Using various adapters on the M 240 I can focus a whole range of non Leica M mount lenses such as Leica R glass, Nikon glass, Mamiya glass or any others I have.
  6. Focus lenses closer than the 0.7m rangefinder closest focus distance – I use both Leica glass but also Voigtlander and Zeiss lenses on the Leica M cameras.  One common feature seen on non-Leica glass is that some lenses can be focused at 0.5m instead of the standard 0.7m Leica rangefinder lens distance.  On the Leica M9 I could only focus these lenses accurately at 0.7m.  With the Leica M 240 the LCD live view mode lets me focus these lenses at 0.5m using the focus peeking.  One lens the really benefits from this is the Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm f1.2 ASPH II lens as the depth of field at f1.2 and 0.5m is very shallow and gives a slight Noctilux look.

I will post more thoughts on the new Leica M 240 camera as I get to use it more.  So far I have no regrets in terms of camera handling and features vs the Leica M9.

Example images:

Leica M 240 + Voigtlander Super Wide Heliar 15mm f4.5

St Barts Brewery London

Leica M240 + Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm f1.2 ASPH II @f1.2

Leica M240 Wedding

Amateur Photographer Magazine – Film Portraits

Amateur Photographer Magazine – Film Portraits

August 1st, 2015

Matt Osborne / http://www.MrLeica.com

Here is an article I wrote recently for the August 1, 2015 issue of Amateur Photographer magazine – “Shoot a Film Portrait”.  You might find it of interest if you have never tried analogue film photography.  Old film cameras can now be purchased on eBay for next to nothing and 35mm AGFA Vista 200 Plus colour film can be bought from Poundland for only £1 a roll in the UK.  Bargain!  If you are used to using a 35mm digital camera and looking for that next step ‘up’ with your photos then film photography offers a cheap entry point to the world of medium format cameras.  Iconic camera brands such as Hassalblad, Rolleiflex, Mamiya and more can be picked up for less than the price of some modern lenses and they will last far longer if looked after.

Amateur Photographer Magazine

Article – #26.  Shoot a Film Portrait

Amateur Photographer Magazine

Original Image (as featured)

  • Model – Katie
  • Camera: Mamiya 645 Super medium format film camera
  • Lens: Mamiya Sekor 80mm f1.9 C @ f1.9
  • Film: 120 Kodak Portra 400

120 Kodak Portra 400

Podcast Interview with MrLeica.com

Podcast Interview with MrLeica.com

OHM AIR – TOYKO

April 2015

Podcast Interview with MrLeica.com & OHM Air

If you want to know more about “Mr Leica” here is a link to a podcast interview I was invited to do for a Tokyo based station, OHM Air.  It is over an hour long so you may want to find a comfy seat and make a cup of tea before considering!

I talk about my photography, Leica cameras, large format photography, film photography, my photography workshops, Leica photographers, Leica wedding photography and some techical aspects.

If you get chance to listen to it I apologise in advance if I ramble or state any incorrect facts.  The content is correct to the best of my knowledge.  I hope you enjoy it and I would love to hear your thoughts, good or bad.

Thanks

Podcast Interview with MrLeica.com – OHM Air Soundcloud

Harriett & Ashley

Harriett & Ashley – Stylised engagement session in Coventry using a 1950s Leica M2 film camera, a Fuji GS645 film camera and my digital Leica M9. Photo show the film wedding photography style I plan to offer for 2015. I use a range of 35mm film, medium format film and large format film cameras in addition to Leica digital.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/32681588@N03/14774898268

LeicaWeddingPhotographer

Vintage Engagement: Harriett & Ashley

http://www.MatthewOsbornePhotography.co.uk / www.MrLeica.com

Coventry Wedding Photographer – Location Shoot

Engagement Session, Coventry

As a Coventry wedding photographer that offers analogue film wedding photography and digital images, I like nothing bettter than engagement sessions. Here is another stylised engagement shoot in Coventry with models Harriett and Ashley. They are not a couple but work well together and it is then my job to then make it all look realistic.  All photos are 100% posed and directed by me yet they hopefully come across as natural.

For the e-session I used three cameras, two analogue film cameras, 1950s Leica M2 + 1980s Fuji GS645, and my digital Leica M9.  Colour photos are film and black and white ones are digital.  I love the look of film and I think the softer images and colours really suit wedding photography and engagements sessions.  The film photos below are in…

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Large Format 4×5 Pacemaker Speed Graphic

Large Format 4×5 Pacemaker Speed Graphic

Matthew Osborne Photography (Mr Leica)

After a few weeks of waiting and many hours of reading finally my first large format camera arrives!  It is a 1947 Pacemaker Speed Graphic 4×5 format film camera but with a few modifications.  The guy I bought it from in the US, Paul, specialised in refurbishing Speed Graphic cameras. More details below.

Purchase Decision

I knew large format photography was just a matter of time for me.  I have been tempted in the past but managed to resist the temptation until now.  As I am really into my film photography it seemed the natural progression to push me to learn something new and to challenge myself to master the art of large format photography.  When I was researching large format portrait photos that I liked on Flickr there seemed to be a general theme appearing.  Regardless of the camera body being used I kept seeing the words “Aero” and “Ektar” in the tags.

After some online research I found that an Aero Ektar was a 178mm f2.5 lens that created the most beautiful bokeh and out of focus areas.  An aperture of f2.5 is very bright for a large format lens (considering that for my 6×6/ 6×7 medium format cameras that I own the fastest lenses are f2.8 – Mamiya RZ67 / Rolleiflex SL66E etc).  When I then went to look to buy a large format camera body and an Aero Ektar lens it was like stepping into a mind field.  I had absolutely no clue what any of these cameras were, whether all lenses fit all cameras, whether these old camera worked, how to fit a lens to a lens board.. the list went on and on.

All the cameras I looked at had their standard f5.6 lenses included or no lens at all.  This was of no interest to me at this stage.  I then got lucky one day searching for the lens to find a modified Pacemaker Speed Graphic camera listed with a Aero Ektar lens attached!!  It came with a higher price tag but after many emails back and forth with Paul he persuaded me that it was worth it and most importantly I would have a working large format 4×5 camera straight out of the box.

Camera Specifics

Body

The camera I purchased was originally a 1947 Pacemaker Speed Graphic with a rear focal plane shutter and shutter speeds up to 1/1000.  It has a Kalart rangefinder mounted on the body but I will use the rear ground glass for critical focus.  This camera was the standard issue press camera in the US until the 1960s often shot at around f11-f16 using the rangefinder and with flash bulbs for illumination.

Lens

The lens is a World War II Kodak Eastman Aero Ektar 178mm f2.5 millitary aerial reconnaissance lens, hence the wide aperture.  It is a huge and heavy piece of glass but Paul has mounted it to a Speed Graphic lens board so that is not front heavy.  It is also modified to accept 77mm filter and has a custom made hood.  The filter threads will be great on a bright day when I want to use the lens wide open at f2.5 as I can use ND filters and also yellow filters for black and white portraits.

Film Back

My Speed Graphic is fitted with a bespoke 4×5 rotating Cambo film back so I can shoot in portrait and landscape orientation without rotating the actual camera.  This is perfect for me.

Film Formats

  • 4×5 Sheet Film

The camera came with 4×5 double sided film holders to accept single sheet 4×5 film.  4×5 film is more expensive than medium format film and very expensive to develop at a lab.  I pay £3.00 a roll to develop C41 colour film (120 and 35mm).  4×5 film costs £3.00 each to develop!  I have looked into this in great depth and found you can actually develop your own 4×5 film in a mod that fits into a 3 roll Paterson tank.  This cuts the cost dramically and helped my overall decision to buy a 4×5 camera.  I will develop by own 4×5 black and white film in Rodinal as I do for 35mm and 120 film. 4×5 film itself is also expensive, especially colour film such as Kodak Portra.  4×5 Fomapan appears to be the most affordable option so I will try that first.  I have used 120 Fomapan film and it was fine to use.

  • 6×7 Roll Film

A cheaper option is to buy a roll film back to fit a 4×5 camera.  It means you do not get the benefit of the 4×5 film format but it will allow me to practise using the large format camera before I then move onto 4×5 sheet film.  120 roll film is fast and easy to load, cheap to develop and less expensive to buy  (per photo).  My film format options were 6×6, 6×7 or 6×9.  I wanted as big as possible ideally (to make use of the large format camera) but settled for a 6×7 Horseman roll film back as I get 10 exposures per roll plus I don’t use the 6×9 format camera I own very often.

  • 4×5 Polaroid Film

Polaroid no longer make 4×5 film but you can still buy expired 4×5 Polaroid film on eBay, just at a cost.  The next option was Fuji FP-100C45 but again this also has been discontinued.  After more reading I found I can use regular Fuji FP100C in a different Polaroid film back and it will work on the Speed Graphic.  This is perfect for me as I have a stock of FP-100C gloss colour film in the fridge that I bought for my Mamiya RZ67 Pro II and better still I have the discontinued Fuji FP-3000B black and white instant film!!  It seemed a waste to use it on the Mamiya but to get a photo that fills the entire paper from the 4×5 camera is very exciting indeed.  I will practise with colour Fuji FP-100C that costs around £13 a pack (10 exposures) and once I am half decent I will start to use some of my black and white Polaorid film.

4x5 Speed Graphic + Kodak Aero Ektar Lens

I will do some detail photos of my modified Speed Graphic with Aero Ektar lens together with some sample images as soon as I get chance.  Interesting and exciting times ahead! 🙂